ASTSWMO

Great Lakes Partnership Principles for Enhancing Habitat at Sediment Remediation Sites

The Great Lakes Legacy Act exemplifies a unique approach for accelerating sediment cleanup and restoring habitat in the largest system of fresh surface water in the world. Funded under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, The Great Lakes Legacy Act provides federal funding to promote cost-sharing partnerships for sediment remediation, including partnerships with State agencies and industry. This webinar from the ASTSWMO Sediments Focus Group shares the presentations made during the ASTSWMO Brownfields and Superfund Symposium in August, 2018, and it provides training on partnering with stakeholders, bridging gaps and thinking outside the box in order to leverage funding, integrate habitat improvements and revitalize tribal, recreational and economic interests.

 

Time-Critical Removal Capabilities

The ASTSWMO Removals Focus Group has produced research that builds off of previous work from their 2013 Transition Issues Analysis. This research focuses on the capacities and needs of the EPA Regions and States in the performance of Time Critical Removal Actions by identifying the resources each potentially offers to this type of response action, and the dynamics of the partnerships created between Federal and State agencies. The result successfully identifies ways to more efficiently use and share limited resources available at all levels and build synergistic partnerships between agencies in the satisfaction of this vital environmental service that protects human health and the environment.

ASTSWMO Position Paper on the Importance of Community Involvement

The history of community involvement in the environmental field has been one of staggered improvement across the nation. The process, priority, and status of community involvement differs significantly not only from each of the 50 States and six Territories, but also from program to program, and site to site. Community involvement is dependant upon program priorities, agency lead (State, Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], Department of Defense (DoD), or other lead agency), program statutory requirements, resources, community economic levels, community interest, and project manager focus. These inherent differences have contributed toward the level of frustration expressed by citizens, regulators, and responsible parties.

State Involvement in Five-Year Reviews at Federal Facilities

The goal of the five-year review is to evaluate the implementation and performance of the selected remedy and to ensure that the remedy chosen for a site remains protective of human health and the environment. As more federal facility cleanups reach Records of Decision there will be an increase in five-year reviews documents in the coming years. This paper highlights States’ involvement with five-year reviews at federal facility cleanups and steps States can take to ensure their comments and recommendations are addressed.

State Concerns with the Process of Identifying Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Applicable, or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements

Over the last five years, the Association of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials’ (ASTSWMO) CERCLA and Brownfields (CaBS) Subcommittee members have been evaluating State and Territorial (State) roles at CERCLA cleanups. One troubling area has been the process of identifying and accepting States cleanup standards and rules as Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in CERCLA cleanups.

The Economics of Recycling: Reports from States and Others

In order to educate ASTSWMO members and others about the economic benefits of recycling, the Sustainable Materials Management Task Force assembled this list of recent reports on the economic benefits of recycling. The time span of reports included is from 2007 to 2017. The compilation is intended to be dynamic. The list will be reviewed on a periodic basis and updated with additional resources as identified.

Waste Generation and Disposal: Awareness, Management, and Disposal Guidance for Solid Waste Containing Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM)

Radioactive material is found naturally in water, soils and rock. When this type of radioactive material is found in its original location and in its natural concentration distributions (including ore bodies) it is referred to as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). Many industrial processes use or come in contact with natural raw materials that contain NORM such as ore, water, soil, rock, oil and natural gas. When industrial processes separate or concentrate the NORM found in these raw materials and expel this radioactive material in their waste streams, the resulting concentrated NORM is referred to as Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (TENORM). The intent of this guidance document is to increase awareness regarding TENORM waste generation, as well as the regulatory and radiological complexities surrounding appropriate and protective TENORM waste management methods.

This document was originally posted December 18, 2017 but has since been updated as of February 15, 2018.